Monthly Archives: January 2014

Peña Nieto, US Condemn Texas Execution Of Mexican Citizen

Story originally published at

fronteras_logo

Mexico President Enrique Peña Nieto said the execution Wednesday of convicted killer and Mexican national Edgar Tamayo in Texas sets “a bad precedent” that flaunts international law.

Peña commented while speaking with Reuters at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

His government had lobbied for a stay of execution while the case was considered, hoping the United States Supreme Court would issue a stay of execution. The high court reconsidered then rejected a stay Wednesday.

Continue reading

Posted in Print | Leave a comment

Bloomberg Editorial: Legal US Pot Won’t Translate Into Peace In Mexico

Story originally published at

fronteras_logo

MARFA, Texas — There’s been a great deal of speculation about the impact in Mexico of marijuana legalization in some American states.

Former Mexican President Vicente Fox, current Guatemalan President Otto Perez Molino, former Colombian Defense Minister and current President Juan Manuel Santos and Uruguay’s President, whose country has legalized the recreational use of marijuana, have all called for marijuana’s legalization or, at the very least, a reconsideration of existing law in their own countries and elsewhere.

For most of these politicians, the rationale is that legalization will weaken the drug cartels’ grip on their nations and lessen drug-related violence.

Continue reading

Posted in Print | Leave a comment

Harvard Revista: The Challenge of Inequality

Revista is published by the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies at Harvard. Spring 2013 is devoted to Panama and includes the photo essay, The Challenge of Inequality.

Southern Darién Province, an emerald maze of rainforest and a crucible of indigenous life, personifies inequality in wealth in modern Panamá. “We’re alone here,” says Grimaldo Contrera, a 40-year-old cacique with jet-black hair and weathered hands that testify to life in rugged Darién.

“The state pledged to help us rebuild our schoolhouse. Nothing has come here but words,” he says showing a visitor his correspondence with authorities. The school has only one shabby room for fifteen children. In 2008, one student in the village was awarded a university scholarship. Contrera says Panamá has money to spend. He says he knows so from listening to the drumbeat of upbeat business stories on radio stations broadcasting from the capital.

Contrera family children swimming ; their family wants to educate them in a better schoolhouse. (Lorne Matalon)

Continue reading

Posted in Photography, Print | Leave a comment

Desperate Patients Smuggle Prescription Drugs from Mexico

Story originally published at

 

In borderland Texas, a widespread lack of health insurance goes along with poverty, and high rates of diseases like diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure.

Cheaper prescription drugs to treat these conditions are available across the border in Mexico. But physicians and law enforcement are tracking a relatively new trend — the smuggling of medicine in bulk from Mexico to U.S. patients who no longer feel safe shopping for them over the border.

Pharmacist Jorge Sandoval says people who buy his medicines these days often buy for people they don’t even know.

Continue reading

Posted in Radio | Leave a comment

Mexico To Texas: The Risk In Illegal Trade Of Prescription Medicine

Story originally published at

fronteras_logo

 

MARFA, Texas — In borderland Texas, a widespread lack of health insurance goes along with poverty, and high rates of diseases like diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure.

Cheaper prescription drugs to treat these conditions are available across the border in Mexico. But physicians and law enforcement are tracking a relatively new trend — the smuggling of medicine in bulk from Mexico to U.S. patients who no longer feel safe shopping for them in Mexico.

Pharmacist Jorge Sandoval says people who buy his medicines these days often buy for people they don’t even know.

Continue reading

Posted in Radio | Leave a comment

Pancho Villa And Modern Mexico: Chihuahua Legislature Convenes In Ojinaga

Story originally published at

fronteras_logo

 

Friday, Jan. 10 marked the 100th anniversary of Mexican revolutionary leader Pancho Villa’s victory at the Battle of Ojinaga, a battle that helped change the course of modern Mexican history.

Iconic images of Villa that resonate even today in Mexico society were taken at that battle. Villa routed Mexican federal troops there and went on to spur the establishment of some of the basic constructs of modern Mexico like agrarian reform and compulsory education.

Pancho Villa, born José Doroteo Arango Arámbula on his horse named Siete Laguas after the Battle of Ojinaga. This image captured a part of his legacy, that of an excellent rider who led his men into battle. Photography by Mutual Film Company

Pancho Villa, born José Doroteo Arango Arámbula on his horse named Siete Laguas after the Battle of Ojinaga. This image captured a part of his legacy, that of an excellent rider who led his men into battle. (Mutual Film Company)

In death he remains a symbol of hope for many of a Mexico still longing to put his democratic ideals into practice.

Continue reading

Posted in Radio | Leave a comment

Forbes Releases List Of 10 Most Corrupt Mexicans In 2013

Story originally published at

fronteras_logo

Dolia Estevez, a contributor to Forbes Magazine, has published a list of the 10 most corrupt Mexicans in 2013.

The list follows the release of Transparency International’s annual corruption index for 2013.The index shows that Mexico ranked 106 out the 177 countries sampled and on a scale of 0 (highly corrupt) to 100 (clean), Mexico scored 34.
Among the Forbes’ list is union boss Elba Esther Gordillo, who was arrested earlier this year.

Continue reading

Posted in Print | Leave a comment

Mexican President Peña Nieto Pushes Border Trade

Story originally published at

fronteras_logo

 

While the United States celebrated Thanksgiving, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto spent the day in a border town so small no Mexican president had ever gone there.

Peña Nieto has already made history by distancing himself from previous Mexican presidents.

Enrique Peña Nieto visited Ojinaga, Chihuahua and sent two messages simultaneously, one for domestic consumption, the other to Washington.

Enrique Peña Nieto visited Ojinaga, Chihuahua and sent two messages simultaneously, one for domestic consumption, the other to Washington.

He wants foreign investment in the state-owned oil industry, an unthinkable act in the eyes of Mexican nationalists.

Continue reading

Posted in Photography, Radio | Leave a comment

USDA And Mexico: Pullout Spells Loss For Border Economy

Story originally published at

hn_logo_new

 

PRESIDIO, Texas — Last year the federal government banned U.S. Department of Agriculture inspectors from entering Mexico at five Texas border crossings to inspect U.S.-bound cattle.

That decision has had a huge economic impact on small border towns in Texas, in particular the city of Presidio. It sits across from Ojinaga, Chihuahua, Mexico. The international port of entry here had been the largest for cattle imports from Mexico into the United States for eight decades.

Cattle move up a ramp following inspection in Presidio, Texas.

Cattle move up a ramp following inspection in Presidio, Texas.

Until last year, the USDA routinely sent inspectors across the border to a state-of-the-art building on the other side of the Rio Grande in Ojinaga.

Continue reading

Posted in Radio | Leave a comment

McDonald Observatory In Texas Retrofits Historic Telescope

Story originally published at

fronteras_logo

 

NEAR FORT DAVIS, TEXAS — The jet black skies in remote sections of the Southwest are the perfect setting for astronomers. Besides the Palomar Observatory in San Diego and the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Ariz., there’s the McDonald Observatory in Texas, now marking its 75th anniversary.

When astronomer Stephen Odewahn was 3 years old, his mother sat him down and told him to watch the launch of the first American in space, Alan Shephard.

“From that time I was always anxious about the sky, looking at the sky, looking at the moon,” Odewahn said.

Continue reading

Posted in Radio | Leave a comment

Texas Silver Mine, Border County’s Largest Taxpayer, Shuts Down

Story originally published at

fronteras_logo

 

SHAFTER, Texas — After two years of hopes for an economic injection to a poverty-plagued part of the border, a Texas silver mine is shutting down at least until next year. Eighty-five people are jobless, the mine is under a safety investigation and the company is ruffling feathers by taking one of the country’s poorest counties to court to cut its tax bill.

The mine’s owner, Vancouver-based Aurcana, says the problem is failing equipment. A ball mill, a huge clone of a cement mixer that sifts silver from dirt, is under repair. New parts are in China and are six weeks away at best.

The history of silver mining here is long and colorful.

The history of silver mining here is long and colorful.

But the matter isn’t simply one of equipment. The mine is facing a declining silver market, federal inspectors have arrived after smoke was released underground and politicians in one of the border’s poorest counties are fending off a lawsuit the company has filed to cut its tax bill.

Continue reading

Posted in Radio | Leave a comment

Chaos In Mexico: Asylum Petitions Surging With Little Chance Of Success

Story originally published at

fronteras_logo

 

The administration of Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto says narco-violence is falling. But it concedes kidnapping and extortion have risen year over year. Polls consistently show Mexicans do not feel safe.

More Mexicans are trying to escape intimidation or violence by petitioning the United States for political asylum. In the past, those applications typically came from victims of wars such as those in Guatemala or El Salvador. Asylum applications from Mexicans have quadrupled since 2009.

Carlos Gutierrez says his feet were hacked off by criminals in Chihuahua, Mexico when he refused to pay them a monthly extortion demand. He is cycling in Texas to highlight his appeal for political asylum. He has been granted a work permit before his appeal is considered.

Carlos Gutierrez says his feet were hacked off by criminals in Chihuahua, Mexico when he refused to pay them a monthly extortion demand. He is cycling in Texas to highlight his appeal for political asylum. He has been granted a work permit before his appeal is considered.

Ojinaga, Chihuahua is a ten minute walk away from Presidio, a border town in far West Texas three hours southeast of El Paso.

Continue reading

Posted in Radio | Leave a comment

Permian Basin Declared Nation’s Largest Oil Production Center

Story originally published at

fronteras_logo

 

The oil industry has written the history of the Permian Basin in West Texas and Eastern New Mexico. Eighteen West Texas counties and three in New Mexico are harvesting the rich remains of an ancient sea floor laden with hydrocarbons.

The federal government’s Energy Information Administration says production has increased by 93,000 barrels per day year-over-year. Production in the basin has risen to the one million barrels a day point in 2011. It’s projected to reach 1.3 million barrels of oil imminently.

The basin is in hyper-expansion mode. What is extracted in the oil field ripples across the regional economy, according to thePermian Basin Petroleum Association.

Continue reading

Posted in Radio | Leave a comment

Riding La Bestia, The Immigration Train

This gallery contains 6 photos.

Story originally published at EDITOR’S NOTE: Mexico has repeatedly accused the United States of mistreating Mexican immigrants — legal or otherwise. But immigration experts in Mexico say that accusation is hypocritical. They charge the treatment of Central American immigrants entering … Continue reading

More Galleries | Leave a comment

Cartel Shootout With Mexican Police Linked To US Grenade Walking Scandal

Story originally published at

fronteras_logo

CBS News is reporting a link between a drug cartel shootout with Mexican police last week and a controversial case in the United States.

A Justice Department report obtained by CBS News says the link is a grenade apparently traced to an American who has been under surveillance for some time.

Fronteras Desk Senior Field Correspondent Michel Marizco has followed the flow of weapons from the U.S. into Mexico as part of his extensive coverage of Operation Fast and Furious. The Justice Department believes the import of grenade parts into Mexico from the U.S. is related.

Continue reading

Posted in Print | Leave a comment

Photo Gallery: Re-Opening The Border At Boquillas

This gallery contains 13 photos.

Story originally published at An unmanned border station in West Texas has opened almost 11 years after the border was sealed following the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. The border station is remotely operated, meaning citizens entering the U.S. will … Continue reading

More Galleries | Leave a comment